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 Music Intervention as a Tool for Improving Patient Experience in Palliative Care

2018/19: Music Intervention as a Tool for Improving Patient Experience in Palliative Care
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2019 Jan;36(1):45-49. Epub 2018 Jul 25.
Cynthia S Peng, Kelly Baxter, Kate M Lally
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30045627/

  • Background: The pain, anxiety, and stress associated with end-of-life care are paramount issues to address for both patients and their families. Reduction in these factors could translate to improved quality of life.

  • Objective: We studied the effect of adding music to standard care for patients receiving a hospice or palliative care consult at 2 hospitals in the Care New England health-care system. In this mixed quantitative and qualitative study, we implemented live music intervention sessions.

  • Design/measurements: Outcomes include symptom burden pre- and post-intervention using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, opioid use in equivalent time periods before and after the music intervention, and qualitative personal narratives of patients' and families' experiences with the music.

  • Results: There were significant decreases in pain, anxiety, nausea, shortness of breath, and feelings of depression along with significant increase in feelings of well-being. Opioid use in time periods after the music intervention trended toward decreased usage when compared to the equivalent time period before. Finally, compiled personal narratives of patients' and families' experiences of the music intervention demonstrated common themes of spirituality, comfort, relaxation, escape, and reflection.

  • Conclusions: This project demonstrated the beneficial effects of music in a patient population that struggles with symptom management when only pharmacologic management is used. These data elucidate biological and psychosocial factors that are positively impacted by the intervention. With additional evidence in music as well as other artistic modalities, it is promising that arts-based programs in inpatient hospice and palliative care settings will continue to expand and flourish.

Haven: Sharing receptive music listening to foster connections and wellbeing for people with dementia who are nearing the end of life, and those who care for them

2018/20: Haven: Sharing receptive music listening to foster connections and wellbeing for people with dementia who are nearing the end of life, and those who care for them
Dementia (London). 2020 Jul;19(5):1657-1671. Epub 2018 Oct 11.
Claire E Garabedian, Fiona Kelly
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30309252/
PDF of this article from Dr. Garabedian’s website 

This paper reports on research exploring the effects of music played for 12 dyads: a care home resident ('resident') with dementia and someone closely connected to him/her ('carer'). 

Six individualised music interventions (3 live and 3 pre-recorded) were played by the first author on solo cello within five Scottish non-NHS care homes. All interventions were video-recorded. Semi-structured interviews with carer participants, key staff, and managers explored their responses to interventions. Thick descriptions of video recordings and interview transcripts were thematically coded using Nvivo. 

A key finding was that structural elements of the interventions combined with characteristics of the music played facilitated an internalised experience of 'haven'; sonically transporting listeners away from their present reality and fulfilling the basic human needs for inclusion, comfort, identity, occupation and attachment.

Music Intervention as a Tool for Improving Patient Experience in Palliative Care

2018/19: Music Intervention as a Tool for Improving Patient Experience in Palliative Care
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2019 Jan;36(1):45-49. Epub 2018 Jul 25.
Cynthia S Peng, Kelly Baxter, Kate M Lally
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30045627/

Background: The pain, anxiety, and stress associated with end-of-life care are paramount issues to address for both patients and their families. Reduction in these factors could translate to improved quality of life.

Objective: We studied the effect of adding music to standard care for patients receiving a hospice or palliative care consult at 2 hospitals in the Care New England health-care system. In this mixed quantitative and qualitative study, we implemented live music intervention sessions.

Design/measurements: Outcomes include symptom burden pre- and post-intervention using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, opioid use in equivalent time periods before and after the music intervention, and qualitative personal narratives of patients' and families' experiences with the music.

Results: There were significant decreases in pain, anxiety, nausea, shortness of breath, and feelings of depression along with significant increase in feelings of well-being. Opioid use in time periods after the music intervention trended toward decreased usage when compared to the equivalent time period before. Finally, compiled personal narratives of patients' and families' experiences of the music intervention demonstrated common themes of spirituality, comfort, relaxation, escape, and reflection.

Conclusions: This project demonstrated the beneficial effects of music in a patient population that struggles with symptom management when only pharmacologic management is used. These data elucidate biological and psychosocial factors that are positively impacted by the intervention. With additional evidence in music as well as other artistic modalities, it is promising that arts-based programs in inpatient hospice and palliative care settings will continue to expand and flourish.

Therapeutic Music Sessions

Music heals. Nurturing Spirit Music brings the gifts of healing song and sound directly to you and/or a loved one, easing the body, mind, and spirit. 

Music has the power to transport us to another time and place. Music can decrease pain, lower blood pressure, reduce anxiety, stabilize heart rate, and more. See the research

Trained in this healing art and science by MHTP (The Music for Healing and Transition Program) Mamma Donna harnesses that power with heart centered music and melodies that help patients to "heal faster, need less pain medication, and have a more positive healthcare experience."

 

Patients and Caretakers alike can find peace and ease during these live therapeutic music sessions. "Imagine staff and caregivers who are less stressed themselves, dealing with less anxious patients." 

Mamma Donna offers these sessions to animals as well as people.

Find out more about them and book a session or series of sessions here.

These sessions are currently offered online only, except for animals.